Archive for the ‘FAQ’ Category

Photo by Jamie Street on Unsplash

Photo by Jamie Street on Unsplash

During your training you should know when your body needs nutrition and liquids.

Especially for longer workouts (more than 1.5 hours) you should not forget to eat and drink. Also during a race it’s essential to feed your body with new energy at the right moment.

How much should I drink?

It depends on many factors (intensity, temperature, etc.). If you do triathlon, don’t forget that you should drink more on your bike because it’s easier than during running. In general you should drink as much as you lose.

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Photo by Garry Neesam on Unsplash

Photo by Garry Neesam on Unsplash

Two weeks before your race are very important. These PEAK-weeks (if they appear in your training schedule) shall bring your body to your personal peak of your effectiveness (PEAKING). Please stick to your training schedule and don’t overstrain you.

You will be confronted with reduced extents in your last week to recover before your race.

UNIMPORTANT vs IMPORTANT

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Photo by Andreas Gücklhorn on Unsplash

Photo by Andreas Gücklhorn on Unsplash

Swimming is the most technical discipline in triathlon.

Bad swimmers

Humans are not born to be good swimmers, because we have no flow line in the water and we can not breath under water.

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Photo by i yunmai on Unsplash

Photo by i yunmai on Unsplash

Training and nutrition stick closely together.

You should eat enough but you don’t have to compensate too much. Very often athletes tend to gain weight, often not only because of additional muscles but also because of their massive calorie intake.

Keep your diet balanced

Eat regularly. If you have no special health conditions, then you can also use a low carb approach. Many athletes think they have to eat a lot of carb.

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Photo by Dingzeyu Li on Unsplash

Photo by Dingzeyu Li on Unsplash

Your muscles and your endurance do not increase and develop during hard trainings but while recovery and regeneration. Many athletes are so ambitious that they forget this important premise.

Recovery can be observed from many views.

Yearly – monthly – weekly recovery

 

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Photo by Oliver Sjöström on Unsplash

Photo by Oliver Sjöström on Unsplash

The optimal weight for your individual body is not easy to calculate. The BMI-factor is from a medical point of view not a perfect measurement, it is a raw classification whether you are overweighted or not.

In general talk to your doctor before starting your workout.

With too much weight and wrong ambition you can injure your joints or stress your circulation. If you run slowly, you burn fat. So lose your weight until you feel comfortable (but don’t lose too much – you know bulimia!).

Watch during your workouts your heart rate, it shouldn’t go too high!

 

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Photo by Artur Łuczka on Unsplash

Photo by Artur Łuczka on Unsplash

Bodies react not always the same to workouts and to measure the training intensity you need a heart rate monitor. In this way you can control your various workouts perfectly.

You don’t go too fast in your workouts, and not too slow. The same is true for races.

Furthermore you can perfectly control your shape, because you i.e. have an average heart rate of 145 instead of 155 at a 10 km (6 mi) run in 50 minutes. (more…)

Photo by Lance Grandahl on Unsplash

Photo by Lance Grandahl on Unsplash

Before a race most of the athletes are nervous because this is what you trained for. Many athletes do not come to their peak performance, because they fall into certain traps.

Avoid the traps before your race

 

 

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Photo by Tyler Nix on Unsplash

Photo by Tyler Nix on Unsplash

During a sport workout your body builds lactic acid which is then removed by your tissues. At a certain amount of stress your body is no longer able to process all of the lactic acid it produces, thus accumulating more and more of it. The point where more acid is produced than removed is called “lactate threshold”.

The lactate threshold marks our starting point to derive your training heart rate zones from, so you should update it frequently. It’s also important to note that the value is specific to each sport, so it has to be determined separately for biking and running.

There are two ways to determine your lactate threshold:

 

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Photo by Jess Watters on Unsplash

Photo by Jess Watters on Unsplash

For the joy of everybody who don’t like to write things down: NO.

You’re not obliged to track your trainings. But to get a better review and an analysis of your efforts it’s necessary.

Training Log

That’s why we recommend for a sustainable and constructive training that you track your workouts in your logbook (in the TriCoreTraining system).

Because the TriCoreTraining system can only react and optimize your training plans based on your efforts, strengths and weaknesses.

 

Find your logbook on TriCoreTraining

 

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